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During the COVID-19 (Coronavirus) Pandemic: Your doctor may recommend switching you from a biologic to a topical treatment for your plaque psoriasis.1 You should not stop biologic therapy without consulting your doctor.

Reference: 1. American Academy of Dermatology Association. Aad.org. https://www.aad.org/member/practice/coronavirus/clinical-guidance/biologics. Accessed June 5, 2020.

What is Plaque Psoriasis?

Plaque psoriasis is an immune-mediated condition. It causes buildup of dead skin cells to appear on the skin as raised, red, white crusted patches called plaques. Plaques can be itchy, painful, and can have a serious impact on your quality of life.1

Plaque psoriasis is an immune-mediated condition. It causes buildup of dead skin cells to appear on the skin as raised, red, white crusted patches called plaques. Plaques can be itchy, painful, and can have a serious impact on your quality of life.1

Psoriasis SEVERITY


Psoriasis can be mild, moderate or severe. The diagrams below outline each degree of severity based on how much of the body is affected (this is called body surface area, or BSA). Psoriasis is also measured based on how it affects a person’s quality of life. Psoriasis can appear anywhere on the body.1

Example of mild psoriasis patient showing localized flare ups on the knees, or elbows, or midriff.
MILD Psoriasis covers
less
than 3%
of the body
Example of moderate psoriasis patient showing larger, localized flare ups on a combination of the knees, or elbows, and midriff.
MODERATE Psoriasis covers
3%
to 10%
of the body
Example of severe psoriasis patient showing large body surface area flare ups on a combination of the knees, or elbows, midriff, and scalp.
SEVERE Psoriasis covers
over
10%
of the body
What triggers a psoriasis flare?

Possible triggers of psoriasis are1:

COLD/DRY WEATHER
stress
SKIN INJURY
medications
inFECTION
TREATMENTS FOR PLAQUE PSORIASIS

There are 3 different types of treatments for psoriasis based on how they are administered:


TOPICALS

Topical treatments are applied directly to the skin. They can be in the form of a lotion, cream, ointment, or foam.


ORAL MEDICATIONS

Oral medications are taken by mouth.


Biologics

Biologics can be taken as an injection or intravenous (IV) infusion.

questions to ask your healthcare provider

When discussing your plaque psoriasis with your healthcare provider, consider these questions:

?

How can I handle flare-ups that need to be controlled ASAP?

My psoriasis is covering a large body surface area, would an easily spreadable lotion be a good fit for me?

Is a topical solution easier to administer than a biologic?

ULTRAVATE® Lotion is more moisturizing than ULTRAVATE® Cream. Is this a better option for dry, thick plaques?

Elbows and knees are problem areas for me. Is a hydrating topical treatment right for my condition?

My 12-year-old child has plaque psoriasis, is an easily spreadable lotion a good option for adolescents?

SAVE ON ULTRAVATE® LOTION

Reference: 1. National Psoriasis Foundation. About Psoriasis. https://www.psoriasis.org/about-psoriasis. Updated March 8, 2020. Accessed May 4, 2020.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

ULTRAVATE (halobetasol propionate) Lotion is a corticosteroid indicated for the topical treatment of plaque psoriasis in patients 12 years of age and older.
IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
Usage: Limit use to 50 g/week. Discontinue treatment when control is achieved. If no improvement is seen within 2 weeks, reassess diagnosis. Treatment beyond 2 consecutive weeks is not recommended. Avoid use on the face, scalp, groin, or axillae.

Effects on Endocrine System: Reversible hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression may occur, with the potential for glucocorticosteroid insufficiency during or after treatment. Systemic effects of topical corticosteroids may also include Cushing’s syndrome, hyperglycemia, and glucosuria. Systemic absorption may require evaluation for HPA axis suppression. Use of potent corticosteroids on large areas, for prolonged durations, under occlusive dressings, or on an altered skin barrier may increase systemic exposure. Children may be more susceptible to systemic toxicity when treated with topical steroids.

Local Adverse Reactions: Local adverse reactions with topical steroids may include atrophy, striae, telangiectasias, burning, itching, irritation, dryness, folliculitis, acneiform eruptions, hypopigmentation, perioral dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, secondary infection and miliaria. These may be more likely to occur with occlusive use, prolonged use or more potent corticosteroids, including ULTRAVATE.

Concomitant Skin Infections: Use an appropriate antimicrobial agent if a skin infection is present or develops.

Allergic Contact Dermatitis: Discontinue ULTRAVATE lotion if allergic contact dermatitis is established.
In clinical trials the most common adverse reactions (≥1%) were telangiectasia, application site atrophy, and headache.

To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Sun Pharmaceutical Industries, Inc. at 1-800-406-7984 or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.

Please see the Full Prescribing Information for complete prescribing details.